Book Review: Come Tumbling Down (Wayward Children #5) by Seanan McGuire

Thank you to Tor.com & NetGalley for the digital copy in exchange for an honest review!

Come Tumbling Down (Wayward Children #5) by Seanan McGuire

Published: 1/7/20 by Tor.com

206 pages

ISBN: 9780765399311

Genre: Fantasy

Rating: 3 out of 5.

B&N | Amazon

Goodreads Synopsis:

When Jack left Eleanor West’s School for Wayward Children she was carrying the body of her deliciously deranged sister–whom she had recently murdered in a fit of righteous justice–back to their home on the Moors.

But death in their adopted world isn’t always as permanent as it is here, and when Jack is herself carried back into the school, it becomes clear that something has happened to her. Something terrible. Something of which only the maddest of scientists could conceive. Something only her friends are equipped to help her overcome.

Eleanor West’s “No Quests” rule is about to be broken.

Again.

Review:

We were lambs for the slaughter, all of us, and if we survived this long, it’s not because we’re special. Come on. Let’s be heroes one more time.”

Sumi

Characters |

This installment of the series pretty much dealt with a lot of old characters—mainly Jack—who I’m unfortunately not a fan of. I didn’t enjoy reading about Jack and Jill in the second book either. I don’t know what it is about them that just makes my blood boil. The Gothic vibe and I don’t mix well.

On a brighter note, I loved Kade and Sumi. Sumi is just a big bundle of illogical confection and a sense of adventure. She will give anyone a pep talk, as mumbo-jumbo as it may get. I also think I love her so much because book three is my favorite in the series.

Kade just wants to do a good job and be a hero.There’s a scene involving him that actually made me sad. I just want to give Kade a hug at all times. He is supposed to be next in line for the school, since Eleanor is losing her interest after Lundy’s death. I can’t imagine the pressure that puts on him. He also deals with the minute problems that happen at the school. He’s definitely a trooper!

Alexis is a new character in this installment. She comes back to the school with Jack. There may or may not be a little female/female relationship going on there. *Wink, wink* I didn’t really have any issues with Alexis. She was a very average character. I enjoyed how great Alexis and Jack were together. I think they make a great pair.

P.S.: I also loved Pony and Bones—a normal horse and a skeleton of a horse. I’m sure you can guess who is who.

Story |

The story in this one fell flat for me. I just couldn’t tell you why, but I think it’s setting up for the next book or a book further down the line. The ending wasn’t disappointing by any means. I was actually pleased with how this one ended.
It just lacked action. They all go to the Moors—Jack’s world—to get her body back. It obviously goes against Eleanor’s rule: “No solicitation. No visitors. No quests.”

To sum it up in three words: water, vampires, and Jill—of course.
Jack is also trying to revive Dr. Bleak—a father figure to her. He helped her in so many ways that her real father never could. It’s sort of a sub-plot that is going to be the main plot in another book.


This one really shoves heroism in your face, and the fight between good and evil. The Moors really shows that fine line between the two sisters. Not that any of that is bad.

Writing |

I love McGuire’s writing. Even though I didn’t enjoy the book very much, I still felt many emotions throughout it. That tends to surprise me every time. I never have a lot to say about an author’s writing unless I absolutely hated the book or absolutely loved it. If you love McGuire, then you will love the writing style in this one!

Overall |

If you’re interested in knowing whether I’m continuing on with the series or not, then you will be happy to know that I am. I’m just hoping that something changes. I haven’t been the biggest fans of the last two installments. I want to love this series, so I’m going to give it another shot, fingers crossed.

“Eleanor West’s Home for Wayward Children was an island of misfit toys, a place to put the unfinished stories and broken wanderers who could butcher a deer and string a bow but no longer remembered what to do with indoor plumbing. It was also, more importantly, a holding pen for heroes. Whatever they might have become when they’d been cast out of their chosen homes, they’d been heroes once, each in their own ways. And they did not forget.”


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